19 Oct 2014 Reblogged from agrizzlyscene

rudygodinez:

Nadja Sveir, Two Photographs from the Series “Black Hole”, (2012)

19 Oct 2014 Reblogged from rudygodinez

(Source: alivetillthe-end, via but-im-a-tomboy)

18 Oct 2014 Reblogged from alivetillthe-end
ordinaryimages:

…last quince to fall. 7-12

ordinaryimages:

…last quince to fall. 7-12

17 Oct 2014 Reblogged from ordinaryimages

17 Oct 2014 Reblogged from loverofbeauty
blankdiary:

selfportrait

blankdiary:

selfportrait

17 Oct 2014 Reblogged from blankdiary
hellyeahgreyhounds:

roller by brieburkhart on Flickr.
beautiful.

hellyeahgreyhounds:

roller by brieburkhart on Flickr.

beautiful.

(Source: misskarenkaz, via 2headedsnake)

17 Oct 2014 Reblogged from misskarenkaz
loverofbeauty:

James Pearson-Howes

loverofbeauty:

James Pearson-Howes

(Source: mpdrolet)

15 Oct 2014 Reblogged from mpdrolet

(Source: son-of-the-hell, via 2headedsnake)

15 Oct 2014 Reblogged from son-of-the-hell

(Source: under-the-guillotine, via lapresquile)

(Source: gh-05-t, via 2headedsnake)

15 Oct 2014 Reblogged from gh-05-t
lushlight:

A lantern slide by Frederick H. Evans, ca. 1890s
Evans was described by Alfred Stieglitz as ‘the greatest exponent of architectural photography’. Evans aimed to create a mood with his photography; he recommended that the amateur ‘try for a record of emotion rather than a piece of topography’. He would spend weeks in a cathedral before exposing any film, exploring different camera angles for effects of light and means of emotional expression. He always tried to keep the camera as far as possible from the subject and to fill the frame with the image completely, and he used a small aperture and very long exposure for maximum definition. Equally important to the effect of his photographs were his printing methods; he rejected the fashion for painterly effects achieved by smudging, blowing or brushing over the surface of the gum paper print. His doctrine of pure photography, ‘plain prints from plain negatives’, prohibited retouching.
artnet & MoMa

lushlight:

A lantern slide by Frederick H. Evans, ca. 1890s

Evans was described by Alfred Stieglitz as ‘the greatest exponent of architectural photography’. Evans aimed to create a mood with his photography; he recommended that the amateur ‘try for a record of emotion rather than a piece of topography’. He would spend weeks in a cathedral before exposing any film, exploring different camera angles for effects of light and means of emotional expression. He always tried to keep the camera as far as possible from the subject and to fill the frame with the image completely, and he used a small aperture and very long exposure for maximum definition. Equally important to the effect of his photographs were his printing methods; he rejected the fashion for painterly effects achieved by smudging, blowing or brushing over the surface of the gum paper print. His doctrine of pure photography, ‘plain prints from plain negatives’, prohibited retouching.

artnet & MoMa

15 Oct 2014 Reblogged from lushlight
ordinaryimages:

…milkweed pods and firefly. 1-12
Note: There’s a challenge floating around the Internet limiting the photographer to one 12 exposure roll of 120 film. Sunday morning I indadvertedly swapped-in an almost dead battery before a spur of the moment walk. On lifting the camera I realized my error and sparingly used whatever juice that was left…as it turned out…all 12 frames : ] Sometimes I challenge myself to a week of being allowed only one exposure per day, other times 36 frames a week. Rarely do I bust a bunch of frames unless motion is involved. 

ordinaryimages:

…milkweed pods and firefly. 1-12

Note: There’s a challenge floating around the Internet limiting the photographer to one 12 exposure roll of 120 film. Sunday morning I indadvertedly swapped-in an almost dead battery before a spur of the moment walk. On lifting the camera I realized my error and sparingly used whatever juice that was left…as it turned out…all 12 frames : ] Sometimes I challenge myself to a week of being allowed only one exposure per day, other times 36 frames a week. Rarely do I bust a bunch of frames unless motion is involved. 

15 Oct 2014 Reblogged from ordinaryimages
ordinaryimages:

…bee on the butterfly bush. 4-12

ordinaryimages:

…bee on the butterfly bush. 4-12

15 Oct 2014 Reblogged from ordinaryimages
ordinaryimages:

…october quince leaf.

ordinaryimages:

…october quince leaf.

(via yama-bato)

15 Oct 2014 Reblogged from ordinaryimages